I wasn’t really Indian. Being a Christian in India was like being the unwanted child left behind by our forefathers who were unwanted settlers. Of course, a lot of things of the past have lost their importance over the years. Also being named Nita made it difficult for the average Indian to even believe I was Christian. I used to hate wearing Indian wear, primarily because during every national event and holiday I never had a proper outfit to wear to school. Until of course I discovered the saree, something I adapted pretty quickly too. But kurta’s was a “never want to wear” feeling.

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However, those feelings fade growing up. It doesn’t really matter because I was never expected to wear Indian ethnic to any of the major events. What really happened was, I discovered a new love for Indian wear when I worked for Fabindia for two years. The best challenge at the job was the ability to mix and match the available products to create a full outfit. Kurtha, pajama, and dupatta too with the value adding accessories. I find summer the best time to pick out my kurtas to wear, also the best season to wear the vibrant Indian` colours.

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Photography by wanderlust artist | styling and editing by Nita Dsouza

I was hoping to create an all Fabindia products in the ensemble, but I guess I haven’t worked there long enough to acquire those many products. My Verdict: Kurta’s are a favourite outfit for the summers. Also, the beauty of a kurta can be magnified or destroyed by the way the dupatta is draped. Show her some love and be fully aware that she will make or break the outfit you choose to wear.

Kurta, dupatta, bangle and earrings: Fabindia

Leggings: Bossini (very old)

Footwear: Commercial st, Bangalore.

Bag: Silk exhibits cum sales

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Hope you like it 🙂

I never really liked Jhumkas, I always found them an over glorified part of the Indian ethnic wear. As a typical nonconformist adolescent, It gave me an extra reason to reject the Jhumkas. However working with Fabindia and dealing with the customers and employees changed my perspective on what really is conformism. One of the rules of conformism in Indian ethnic wear is Jhumkas can not be worn with western outfits. I would ignore it when a customer would say it to me with a smile on my face, but few weeks ago I had one of my own family members saying it to me 😉 Oh my, it felt like a lightning strike my face! So I just decided to break that myth. 

IMG_1096 with focal colour boostIMG_1225 new colour boostIMG_1243 new bannerSo why did a nonconformist adult decide to buy a pair of shiny brass polished pearl ending Jhumkas? I’m not sure, Maybe because I’m still an impulsive buyer and the Jhumkas were love at first sight.

Hope you like it.

 

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Photography by wanderlust artist | styling and editing by Nita Dsouza

My Verdict: The Jhumkas are just like any other statement earrings. Does it matter if I’ve worn them with a shirt? not really. The pants were a part of the trend called the paper bag waists (ref link) Love the trend but I guess I needed a size bigger cause I’ve grown fat as of now!

Shirt: Forever 21

Pant: Lara Karen @jabong

Earrings & kolapuris: commercial st.

Clutch: Fabindia

 

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